Spruce Grouse photos

Alaska is home to four different grouse species. I have photographed three of them, with the majority of them spruce grouse photos, because they are the most widely distributed of the four species in Alaska. All of the spruce grouse photos on this site are available to license as stock photos for commercial use or to purchase as fine art prints for your home and office decor.

Spruce grouse, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce grouse, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Spruce grouse, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce grouse, Katmai National Park, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce Grouse (Dendragopus candensis)

The Spruce grouse in Alaska are known to be rather tame, and approaching them is often easy. They inhabit the dense spruce woods and feed on berries and spruce needles. The varied color and pattern in their feathers make them an attractive bird. Adults have a long square black tail, brown at the end. Adult males are mainly gray with a black breast with white bars, a black throat and a red patch over the eye. Adult females are mottled brown with dark and white bars on the underparts. Males have the distinct red band around the eye.

Male Spruce grouse in courting display, boreal forest, spring, Fairbanks, Alaska (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Male Spruce grouse in courting display, boreal forest, spring, Fairbanks, Alaska (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce Grouse breeding habits

Their breeding habitat is the boreal forests or taiga across Alaska. During the breeding season (spring), the red above the eye of the male bird is accentuated, and fan-tailed feather displays may be seen as they vie for female attention. They nest on the ground in dense growth.

Male Spruce grouse doing a courtship display, Denali National Park, interior, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Male Spruce grouse doing a courtship display, Denali National Park, interior, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce Grouse behavior

Spruce grouse are permanent residents. Some move short distances by foot to a different location for winter. These birds forage on the ground or in trees in winter. The caeca, digestive sacs in the intestines, increase in size to support the bird’s winter diet of conifer needles. In summer, they also eat berries, green plants, and some insects. The spruce grouse has great confidence in its camouflage, and will often stay still even when approached within a few feet (1 m). It is this characteristic that has earned them the nickname “Fool Hens”. During the winter months, however, the spruce grouse will become very skittish due to a lack of camouflage; they take flight when approached within 20-150 feet (6-45 m). A male on territory makes a drumming sound by flapping his wings.

Male spruce grouse in boreal forest, arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Male spruce grouse in boreal forest, arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)


Spruce grouse perches in the bow of a spruce tree, arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Spruce grouse perches in the bow of a spruce tree, Arctic, Alaska. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus)

Ruffed grouse feeds in quaking aspen tree in winter, Fairbanks, Alaska (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Ruffed grouse feeds in quaking aspen tree in winter, Fairbanks, Alaska (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus)

Sharp-tailed grouse perched on the top of a black spruce tree in Alaska's arctic. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Sharp-tailed grouse perched on the top of a black spruce tree in Alaska’s Arctic. (Patrick J. Endres / AlaskaPhotoGraphics.com)

Text adapted from Wikipedia under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.